Africa

Recent Articles

While natural resources have the potential to bring development to the poorest countries in the world, realizing that potential is often a challenge. Opaque allocation of rights to extract oil, gas or minerals; secrecy around who really owns the companies doing the extraction; and non-disclosure of contracts often conspire to prevent average citizens from benefiting from their country’s resources.

In the last decade, governments of resource-rich countries like Zambia, Guinea and Mongolia have struggled to tax their extractive industries more effectively. It is a tall order—countries must design an inescapable tax regime that taxes companies more in times of high profits and allows some relief in periods when gains are low.

Ghana’s Minister of Finance recently presented the country’s 2016 budget, titled “Consolidating Progress Towards a Brighter Medium Term.” As the title of the budget reflects, 2015 has been a turbulent year for Ghana’s public finances. One setback was the continued drop in oil prices—a major shock since Ghana has been exporting petroleum since 2011...

There are close links between politics and the management of extractives such as oil, gas and minerals. Along the extractive industries value chain politicians are involved in setting the legal framework, allocating exploration and production licenses and deciding on the saving and spending of extractive revenues.

NRGI’s blog received tens of thousands of unique visits this year. Below, we share the 10 most-read blog pieces of 2015. From country-specific perspectives to globally relevant policy discussions, NRGI experts offered news, insight and prescriptions over the course of the year.

With over a decade of journalism experience, Xinhua News Agency senior correspondent Justice Adoboe is far more experienced than the typical NRGI media trainee. In covering the complex extractives space, however, Adoboe said he has room to grow. NRGI trainers, meanwhile, discovered the course itself had to grow and change.