Parliaments

Parliaments can significantly increase natural resource revenues and help use them wisely, if lawmakers understand the issues and their own budget oversight responsibilities. NRGI’s training program gives parliaments the knowledge they need to foster national growth and reduce poverty.

Our toolkit includes briefings on managing oil, gas and minerals, videos offering lessons from lawmakers in their own words, and a study of our impact to date: The Capacity to Change. Click here for more information on our parliamentary programming.

Parliaments can significantly increase natural resource revenues and help use them wisely, if lawmakers understand the issues and their own budget oversight responsibilities. NRGI’s training program gives parliaments the knowledge they need to foster national growth and reduce poverty.

Our toolkit includes briefings on managing oil, gas and minerals, videos offering lessons from lawmakers in their own words, and a study of our impact to date: The Capacity to Change. Click here for more information on our parliamentary programming.

Featured Video

By working directly with civil society, Tanzanian MPs were able to improve their draft mining bill dramatically.

Featured Video

Lawmakers from Uganda, Sierra Leone and Tanzania face the serious responsibility of ensuring that resource wealth can translate into public benefit.


This overview includes sources of information for analysis and research by members of parliament, parliamentary and caucus staff in improving the management of extractive industries.

 

Natural Resource Governance Institute team members are set to take part in a full slate of activities at the EITI Global Conference in Lima, Peru, from February 24-25.

In this era of low commodity prices, oil- and mineral-rich governments in Eurasia are under acute financial pressure.

NRGI’s blog received tens of thousands of unique visits this year. Below, we share the 10 most-read blog pieces of 2015. From country-specific perspectives to globally relevant policy discussions, NRGI experts offered news, insight and prescriptions over the course of the year.

There are close links between politics and the management of extractives such as oil, gas and minerals. Along the extractive industries value chain politicians are involved in setting the legal framework, allocating exploration and production licenses and deciding on the saving and spending of extractive revenues.

Parliamentarians have a crucial role to play in reviewing legislation on oil, gas and minerals, and in overseeing the government’s management of these extractive sectors. For instance, in Ghana members of parliament are actively overseeing the projections and allocations of oil revenues by scrutinizing compliance with the Petroleum Revenue Management Act...

Minerals account for almost half of Mongolia’s gross domestic product, making extractive sector oversight an important function of the country’s government. In recent years, NRGI has worked with Mongolia’s leaders to improve transparency and better harness national revenues...

Across sub-Saharan Africa, civil society groups and journalists have been playing an increasingly important role in advocating for governance reform. Part of their aim is to increase the chances that their countries’ sub-soil wealth might be transformed into meaningful strides in development.

Briefings

Extractive contracts are principal documents between a government and a company that details the terms and conditions under which a resource is exploited. While many jurisdictions have not traditionally made their oil, gas and mineral contracts available to the public, more recent developments show that contract disclosure is feasible and desirable for a wide range of countries...

The Extractives Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) seeks to improve transparency and accountability in the oil, gas and mining sectors. In countries participating in EITI, oil, gas and mining companies must publish what they pay to governments, and governments must publish what they receive...

A fiscal regime is the set of instruments (e.g., taxes, royalties, dividends) that determines how the often-vast sums of funds generated by oil, gas and mining projects are shared between the state and investors...

Oil, gas and mineral resources are distinctly different from other sources of government income. Only through good macroeconomic policy and public financial management can a country take full advantage of natural resources...

State participation in oil, gas and mining is often exercised through state-owned enterprises (SOEs), whereby governments take a direct ownership stake in oil, mineral or gas ventures, either as the sole commercial entity or in partnership with private companies...

Members of parliament (MPs) require robust information about oil, gas and mineral revenues in order to effectively monitor government management of these resources in the public interest and to fully understand the origin of the revenues that enter (or in some cases fail to enter) the national budget...