Subnational: Harnessing Oil, Gas and Minerals for Local Development

Resource rich areas in developing countries are often the poorest and most unstable. Yet subnational governments are receiving increasing resource revenues, are regulating and managing many different aspects of the extractive sector and are responsible for providing money for the most important social services to their citizens. Building capacity of subnational actors is key to improving governance of extractive industries.

NRGI’s capacity building program works with local and national governments, civil society, journalists and companies to promote transparent, accountable and effective management of nonrenewable natural resources.

Resource rich areas in developing countries are often the poorest and most unstable. Yet subnational governments are receiving increasing resource revenues, are regulating and managing many different aspects of the extractive sector and are responsible for providing money for the most important social services to their citizens. Building capacity of subnational actors is key to improving governance of extractive industries.

NRGI’s capacity building program works with local and national governments, civil society, journalists and companies to promote transparent, accountable and effective management of nonrenewable natural resources.

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In 2008, NRGI—in collaboration with the Open Society Foundations Local Government and Public Service Reform Initiative (OSF-LGI)—designed a project to address the enormous governance challenges facing local governments in Peru.

Featured Video

Our videos explain how governments, civil society, journalists and companies got together with NRGI to promote transparent, accountable and effective management of nonrenewable natural resources. These videos describe the impact of such projects and offer lessons for future efforts.

Featured Video
Case studies from our pilot projects in Ghana, Indonesia, Nigeria, Peru and a briefing distilling lessons from them provide valuable lessons for governments, civil society, journalists and companies on harnessing the benefits of extraction at the local level.

Indonesia’s petroleum and mining sectors helped power the country’s transition to middle-income status. As considerable drivers of Indonesia’s annual economic growth, extractive industries contribute about a third of exports and state revenues, generate hundreds of thousands of jobs, and fuel the growth of non-resource-based industries.

China has been included in the Top 10 list of foreign investors in Indonesia since 2014. As in many other countries, China’s interest in Indonesia is in its energy and mining sectors; more than half of its total investment has been directed toward extractive industries.

This photo essay is the sixth installment in NRGI's 2015 extractive industries photo documentary project, which aims to capture the complex political, environmental and social realities at resource extraction sites throughout Myanmar.


The large fall in the price of oil since mid-2014 is on the whole good news for Tanzania, which is a net importer of oil. Indeed, Tanzanian stocks are around 40 percent higher than when oil prices began falling from a peak of $115 a barrel on June 19 last year...

This photo essay is the fifth installment in NRGI's 2015 extractive industries photo documentary project, which aims to capture the complex political, environmental and social realities at resource extraction sites throughout Myanmar.


Indonesia's President recently outlined new economic policies which aim to produce greater certainty and efficiency in business through deregulation, de-bureaucratization, and improved law enforcement. His overall objective is to revive foreign investment in Indonesia in the context of global economic slowdown.

In the second of a series of photo essays by six different photographers in Myanmar, Minzayar documents the way in which jade from Myanmar makes its way, untaxed, to bustling Chinese markets.


Briefings

Decentralized mining licensing in Indonesia has produced mostly negative outcomes. This policy briefing explores some of them, and also makes recommendations for how Indonesia (and other countries) might address the challenges of deciding how and at what level to issue mineral licenses.

This paper distills lessons learned from pilot projects that RWI implemented in Ghana, Indonesia, Nigeria and Peru between 2008 and 2012. It complements country case studies and policy papers—including a synthesis of this paper, all available at revenuewatch.org/subnational.

A case study of the two-year Asutifi subnational project, which aimed to improve the governance of mining revenues in a tiny district in central Ghana.

This RWI study explores how Indonesia's Blora and Bojonegoro districts are turning local resource revenues into sustainable development.

This subnational study explores RWI's work in Nigeria's Bayelsa State to increase local transparency and accountability of oil revenues.

In 2008, RWI designed a project to address the enormous governance challenges facing regional and local governments in Peru.