Interviews, background on NRGI research and training events and up-to-the-minute analysis by staff and experts from around the world.

NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann joined World Bank and IMF executives and other experts on stage in Lima, Peru last week to discuss the topic "Individual Integrity and Public Sector Governance."

Today, the International Monetary Fund released its model for evaluating and designing oil and mining deals in resource-rich countries. NRGI welcomes the move. With growing availability of open data on extractives and a growing community of users of such models, it’s an important step toward bettering public scrutiny and understanding of resource deals and the flow of revenues.

NRGI president and CEO Daniel Kaufmann, who co-produces the Worldwide Governance Indicators published by the World Bank, discussed his recent article “Corruption Matters” with the IMF’s Bruce Edwards. Published in September in Finance & Development, the piece discusses the larger themes of governance and corruption in Latin America and elsewhere.

Confronting corruption in Latin America--one of the great development challenges the region faces--means understanding the shape it takes in respective nations. On Tuesday in Santiago, Chile, NRGI president and CEO Daniel Kaufmann took part in a morning event organized by the Universidad Adolfo Ibañez and Espacio Público focused on the outstanding challenges of corruption in Chile and throughout Latin America.

Earlier this year, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed the Public Finance Management Act 2015 into law and created one of the world's newest sovereign wealth funds. While the law provides a solid framework for effective governance, several key elements are missing—elements that would determine whether Uganda will truly benefit from its oil windfalls.

In the first of a series of photo essays by six different photographers in Myanmar, Lauren DeCicca has documented the challenging circumstances faced by community members living alongside the giant copper mine.

In 2014, NRGI commissioned images by a Myanmar photographer, Minzayar, of the illegal jade miners that have flowed into the country’s northern Kachin state in pursuit of higher incomes. The project allowed thousands of viewers worldwide to connect faces to one of the most famously controversial aspects of the country’s extractive economy. Because of the attention and interest generated by Minzayar’s photos, NRGI has committed to further visually mapping extractives realities in Myanmar.

The UK and Norway oil and gas sectors provide an ideal comparison through which to compare the outcomes from different approaches to oil sector governance. The two countries have equivalent geology and a similar resource base – the North Sea Basin is effectively split down the middle between them.

The World Bank has released a new edition of the Worldwide Governance Indicators, which combine the views of a large number of enterprise, citizen and expert survey respondents in industrial and developing countries.

Eighty percent of resource-rich countries fall short in channeling extractives wealth into citizen benefit, according to the 2013 Resource Governance Index (RGI), which measures countries’ governance, including regulation, transparency and accountability across the resource sector.

NRGI has made a submission to the US SEC in relation to the rulemaking for Section 1504 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

In a recent blog post for the Brookings Institution, NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann writes about the current “governance moment.” He draws on developments at the UN General Assembly and elsewhere, as well as the release of a new edition of the Worldwide Governance Indicators, to make the point that governance is measurable, and that the resulting data is a critical tool in country-level and global efforts to improve.

The State Oil Fund of the Azerbaijan Republic (SOFAZ) was created in 1999 to promote macroeconomic stability, preserve oil revenues for future generations and channel Azerbaijan’s resource wealth into more productive assets...

Parliamentarians have a crucial role to play in reviewing legislation on oil, gas and minerals, and in overseeing the government’s management of these extractive sectors. For instance, in Ghana members of parliament are actively overseeing the projections and allocations of oil revenues by scrutinizing compliance with the Petroleum Revenue Management Act...

In a detailed submission to the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), economist Robert Conrad of Duke University recently shared his expert perspective on the critical importance of oil, gas and mining companies publicly reporting project-level payments to governments around the world.

Citizens from resource-rich African countries are showing ever-greater interest in the management of extractive resources. Civil society members and journalists are demanding transparency and accountability.

This week, 29 participants from 13 countries — including Ghana, Chile, Uganda, Myanmar, Mongolia and Guinea — are taking part in our third annual Executive Course in Oil, Gas and Mining Governance in Oxford.

Francisco Paris, the EITI international secretariat’s regional director for Latin America and the Caribbean, attended the EITI Latin America Regional Conference in Lima, where government, civil society and corporate representatives met to discuss pressing socio-environmental concerns in the region...

Poor governance and systemic corruption are prevalent in many resource-rich countries. Given their highly concentrated and highly profitable nature, the oil, gas and mining industries can generate the kind of political and private incentives that favor rent-seeking and institutional (or state) capture.

For the first time since it won in 1990, the National League for Democracy (NLD), led by Aung San Suu Kyi, will be contesting a general election. (The NLD won 43 out of 45 seats in a 2012 by-election.) Should the party or a coalition of opposition parties win, Myanmar will have its first majority civilian government in Myanmar in 53 years.

Lack of transparency about complex, often secretive structures. Clandestine, opaque relationships with government officials. These factors exacerbate the risks that beneficial owners of some extractive companies could easily engage in tax evasion, transfer pricing, trade mispricing, bribery, contract fraud and money laundering.

When we think about the “resource curse,” one oft-cited example is oil-rich Venezuela. Despite copious petroleum reserves, people in one of Latin America's top hydrocarbon producers queue for hours outside supermarkets to buy staple foods, and now cite food shortages as a bigger concern than crime.

During the oil boom years earlier this decade, rising petroleum subsidies in importing countries such as Tunisia and Egypt were a constant strain on budgets—and so the collapse in oil prices has produced nuanced challenges for state-owned oil enterprises (SOEs) in both countries.

For Indonesia, lower commodity prices have had mixed results. Government revenues from oil, natural gas coal and other minerals have fallen, but lower prices have also helped the Southeast Asian net importer.

On Thursday, 3 September, NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann joined a plenary conversation on the role of anti-corruption and transparency in the fight against poverty.