Recent Articles

In this era of low commodity prices, oil- and mineral-rich governments in Eurasia are under acute financial pressure.

NRGI’s blog received tens of thousands of unique visits this year. Below, we share the 10 most-read blog pieces of 2015. From country-specific perspectives to globally relevant policy discussions, NRGI experts offered news, insight and prescriptions over the course of the year.

There are close links between politics and the management of extractives such as oil, gas and minerals. Along the extractive industries value chain politicians are involved in setting the legal framework, allocating exploration and production licenses and deciding on the saving and spending of extractive revenues.

With over a decade of journalism experience, Xinhua News Agency senior correspondent Justice Adoboe is far more experienced than the typical NRGI media trainee. In covering the complex extractives space, however, Adoboe said he has room to grow. NRGI trainers, meanwhile, discovered the course itself had to grow and change.

The large fall in the price of oil since mid-2014 is on the whole good news for Tanzania, which is a net importer of oil. Indeed, Tanzanian stocks are around 40 percent higher than when oil prices began falling from a peak of $115 a barrel on June 19 last year...

Parliamentarians have a crucial role to play in reviewing legislation on oil, gas and minerals, and in overseeing the government’s management of these extractive sectors. For instance, in Ghana members of parliament are actively overseeing the projections and allocations of oil revenues by scrutinizing compliance with the Petroleum Revenue Management Act...

Managing public expectations is one of the toughest challenges that governments face now that commodity prices have dramatically declined. A gathering earlier this month in Tanzania brought together public officials from 15 emerging producers to discuss the implications of the price drop on their strategies.

NRGI is rolling out this year’s training program for African journalists interested in improving their knowledge of and skills in covering the extractive sectors of oil, gas and minerals.

This week, NRGI is hosting extractives experts from six countries to at the International Open Data Conference (IODC) in Ottawa, Canada.

Minerals account for almost half of Mongolia’s gross domestic product, making extractive sector oversight an important function of the country’s government. In recent years, NRGI has worked with Mongolia’s leaders to improve transparency and better harness national revenues...

Across sub-Saharan Africa, civil society groups and journalists have been playing an increasingly important role in advocating for governance reform. Part of their aim is to increase the chances that their countries’ sub-soil wealth might be transformed into meaningful strides in development.

On March 30, Asiia Sasykbaeva, deputy speaker of parliament in Kyrgyzstan, met with Galib Efendiev, Eurasia director for the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI), to exchange views on the country’s mining sector development and legal framework.

As part of our programming, NRGI has developed five briefings offering an overview of the current situation in Myanmar's extractive sector on the following topics: EITI, contract disclosure, revenue management, state-owned enterprises and fiscal regimes.

This recently posted video is from the 2014 high-level executive extractives course at Oxford University’s Blavatnik School of Government.

Falling oil prices have had dramatic effects on the solvency of highly oil-dependent countries, particularly those that have not saved much of their windfall receipts in boom years. In November, Ghana’s finance ministry presented its 2015 Budget Statement and Economic Policy to parliament...

Ghana’s Minister of Finance has tabled before the country’s parliament the government’s 2015 budget and economic policy statement. The budget statement includes economic forecasts, estimated revenues and proposed resource allocation for the upcoming financial year, as well as projections for 2015 petroleum receipts.

For more than a century, mining has played a prominent role in Ghana’s economy. Despite recent mine closures spurred by falling gold prices, the sector has averaged $2 billion per year for more than five years, accounted for 6 percent of GDP, and contributed 18 percent of total corporate tax earnings and 27 percent of total government revenues...

A study tour in September brought six Mongolian MPs and three parliamentary staff members to western Canada, where they met with tax and public finance officials from British Columbia and Alberta, provincial and federal legislators, leaders of Canada’s First Nations (indigenous communities), and representatives from industry who work with mining-affected communities.

Four years ago, Mongolia’s vast mineral wealth prompted some to call it the “Saudi Arabia of Central Asia”. Today, the country is struggling with declining mineral revenues and inflation.

Earlier this month six Mongolian members of parliament (MPs) and three parliamentary staff members toured western Canada to learn about Canada’s experience managing its mineral and oil booms and busts.

Parliamentarians in Niger are preparing to draft natural resource legislation, which could possibly include the creation of a sovereign wealth fund to benefit future generations...

Greetings from the first of two weeks of the summer school course that the NRGI organizes annually in Yaoundé, Cameroon, in partnership with the Catholic University of Central Africa...

Stakes are high in Afghanistan as officials audit the presidential runoff election to determine who will lead the country during its pivotal “transformational decade.”

Imagine this: A biochemical process forms hydrocarbons, in reserves that are proven or unproven, and in types that are sweet and light or heavy and sour. Then find out the commercial viability of such reserves and measure the output in barrels per day...