Recent Articles

Today, Switzerland-based trading house Trafigura disclosed how much it paid to several governments in exchange for commodities in its first annual responsibility report. For decades, physical commodity traders have embraced secrecy as a basic part of their business model, even when dealing with public institutions. The disclosures by Trafigura represent a much-needed step away from this unfortunate tradition. There remains, however, ample room for improvement.

The Open Government Partnership, which launched in 2011, quickly morphed into a popular initiative. OGP membership has grown from just eight countries to 66 participating nations. Many governments and international organizations have given it direct support.

The oil, gas and mining sectors are critical for a majority of Open Government Partnership (OGP) countries. Yet, only about 10 percent of OGP commitments relate to natural resources...

"It is my great hope that we will reach a day when the Open Government Partnership will not be needed. I wish for that day to come soon. Not because I have given up on the power of our work as governments and civil society together. To the contrary. Because I believe that open government should become a matter of course – the everyday means of empowering people."

Switzerland, the world’s leading commodity trading hub, must pave the way for more transparency in natural resource payments. The Swiss government should alter its course and include commodity trading in a pending transparency law.

NRGI joined World Bank and IMF executives and others on stage in Lima, Peru, to discuss "Individual Integrity and Public Sector Governance" and took part in a slate of other activities at the annual meetings.

NRGI has made a submission to the US SEC in relation to the rulemaking for Section 1504 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

Citizens from resource-rich African countries are showing ever-greater interest in the management of extractive resources. Civil society members and journalists are demanding transparency and accountability.

Poor governance and systemic corruption are prevalent in many resource-rich countries. Given their highly concentrated and highly profitable nature, the oil, gas and mining industries can generate the kind of political and private incentives that favor rent-seeking and institutional (or state) capture.

On Thursday, 3 September, NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann joined a plenary conversation on the role of anti-corruption and transparency in the fight against poverty.

In the past six months, 24 countries have released new Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative reports disclosing over $200 billion in payments from more than 2,000 companies. These are the first reports prepared under the broader EITI Standard that was introduced in 2013...

Tunisia has been celebrated by the international community as a beacon of hope and as fertile ground for transitional democracy in a region rocked by political conflict and unrest.

In a wide-ranging interview this month with Critical Resource, NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann discusses differences in corporate behavior between the mining and hydrocarbon sectors...

Las Naciones Unidas (ONU) aprobaron en el año 2000 los Objetivos de Desarrollo del Milenio (ODM), como agenda común global para iniciar el Siglo XXI reduciendo de manera sustancial la pobreza y promoviendo el desarrollo humano en forma sostenible.

With only two days left before Brazil’s general elections, a corruption scandal involving the country’s state-owned oil and gas company has become a dead weight around the neck of the ruling party.

On September 24, the Open Government Partnership held a high-level event at the UN, where NRGI’s Suneeta Kaimal and fellow OGP co-chairs showcased country commitments and presented the 2014 Open Government Awards honoring citizen engagement initiatives from around the world...

Recently, Indonesia hosted the first Asia Pacific OGP regional conference in Bali, where civil society organizations urged governments to safeguard and promote free civic space, adopt governance as a standalone goal in the post-2015 development agenda, and formally join OGP.

In October 2014 the co-chairs of the Open Government Partnership will change.  As the Government of Indonesia and Rakesh Rajani complete their one-year term as lead chairs, the current support chairs - the Government of Mexico and Suneeta Kaimal – will assume the role of lead chairs...

Fewer than half of the 14 Open Government Partnership countries have made extractives-related commitments. There is still considerable room for collaboration between the two initiatives on mutual concerns.

On Monday, August 4, NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann joined a panel hosted by the Open Society Foundations in Washington, D.C., to discuss the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit. More information on the event, as well as a list of recommended joint commitments and actions to come out of the summit, are available here.

When it comes to mining policy, consensus is hard to find south of the Equator.

Beyond the IRM and a government self-assessment, an essential component of OGP work in any country is the development of so-called shadow reports, which help identify gaps in the implementation process and measure progress...

What are "shadow reports" and how are they used to help OGP in making governments "more open, accountable, and responsive to citizens"? Paul Maassen, OGP civil society coordinator, says they provide "an extra tool to push for real government commitment."

In line with U.S. and EU legislation, the EITI now requires companies to report payments on a project-by-project basis. It also encourages countries to disclose the identity of the real owners—“beneficial owners” – of the companies that have acquired rights to extract oil, gas and minerals.