Recent Articles

During last month’s Asia-Pacific hub training in Indonesia, RWI-NRC and the Universitas Gadjah Mada organized a field trip for participants to Bojonegoro, an oil-producing district in East Java... fills a gap in public access to information about the extractive industries in Mexico, where oil extraction in nine states provides 35 percent of budget revenues and where mining concessions occupy 16 percent of all land.

More than a hundred civil society actors from various countries gathered to talk about two hot topics in the Asia-Pacific region: extractive issues and the future of natural resource governance.

At a recent proposal-writing workshop organized by the Revenue Watch Institute – Natural Resource Charter in Erbil, Iraq, three participants thoughtfully answered a question: how is oil a tool for development?

Most southeast Asian countries operate relatively well developed extractive sectors. However, at the local level, significant knowledge asymmetries remain...

Since the massive Oyu Tolgoi gold and copper mine opened in the Gobi Desert in 2010, billions of Mongolian tugrugs have poured into the government’s coffers in Ulaanbaatar...

In mismanaged economies, the path to government accountability and sustainability begins with transparency—but there is often resistance along the way. After all, power is at stake...

On Sunday, January 26, three years after the revolution, Tunisia’s parliament (the Tunisian National Constituent Assembly (or NCA) voted the country’s new constitution into law.

Citizens around the world are demanding more openness from their governments. They are seeking ways to participate in the decisions that affect them, and for governments to be more transparent, responsive, accountable, and effective. But what steps can governments can take to heed this call to action?

Mexico President Enrique Peña Nieto and the Institutional Revolutionary Party have chosen the way of privatization for the country’s oil and gas sector. This is a big deal.

The Neftchala Operating Company, a daughter company of Global Energy, did not welcome CRN monitoring in 2012, so the Network brought the problem to Global Energy and to the Ministry of Ecology and Natural Resources...

Last week at a workshop in Burkina Faso’s capital, Ouagadougou, coalitions from five African countries presented the results of their efforts to combine legal analysis of contracts with detailed on-the-ground monitoring of implementation and interviews with key government, community and mining company officials.

Revenue Watch, the School of Public Policy at the Central European University, and the Natural Resource Charter are now accepting applications for 2014's advanced course, "Reversing the Resource Curse: Theory and Practice."

To support implementation of the new EITI standard, RWI and local partner ORCADE organized a workshop for civil society in francophone Africa, November 5-7, 2013, at Ouagadougou, in Burkina Faso.

A country’s economy can withstand depressions and problems if it is diversified. In our case, the main problem is the heavy dependence of the country’s economy on oil resources.

Watch the final plenary session, which highlights summit achievements and looks forward.

Has oil money in Azerbaijan impacted people in rural areas? Is there any difference between the present and ten years ago in the lives of villagers?

In London, October 30 to November 1,the Summit opens with the OGP Civil Society Day on Wednesday and then continues with the Plenary Conference Thursday and Friday.

The Oil Workers’ Rights Protection Organization held a meeting to discuss results of the monitoring provided at the first stage.

Last Friday in Washington D.C., representatives of civil society, government and the private sector shared their views at the World Bank (WB) Event, “Blessing or Curse: Making Earth's Riches Work for Poor and Fragile Countries.”

The winners of the Soros Foundation Kazakhstan's grant competition were announced Monday.

In terms of water access in Azerbaijan, the answer is complex.

In a historic event for Myanmar, 226 representatives from over 100 civil society organizations across the country, representing all states as well as cross-border groups, met October 1-3, 2013, in the first national civil society conference on the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI).

The group will consist primarily of government officials involved in the management of their country’s extractive industries and civil society representatives with expertise in this area, bringing collective technical expertise, diagnostic tools and cross-­-comparative experience to support countries to develop targeted, impactful commitments.