Recent Articles

The third anniversary of the unjust imprisonment of NRGI advisory council member Ilgar Mammadov comes at a grave inflection point for Azerbaijan. The government, made wealthy by Caspian oil deposits, is now on its knees due to cratering oil prices.

Indonesia’s petroleum and mining sectors helped power the country’s transition to middle-income status. As considerable drivers of Indonesia’s annual economic growth, extractive industries contribute about a third of exports and state revenues, generate hundreds of thousands of jobs, and fuel the growth of non-resource-based industries.

China has been included in the Top 10 list of foreign investors in Indonesia since 2014. As in many other countries, China’s interest in Indonesia is in its energy and mining sectors; more than half of its total investment has been directed toward extractive industries.

In November 2015, PWYP members from across Eurasia met in Ulaanbaatar for an NRGI-led training session to discuss common extractives governance challenges their countries face. Shrinking civil society space was a dominant concern.

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission voted today on a proposed rule to implement Section 1504 of the 2010 Dodd-Frank Act. The law requires US-listed oil, gas and mining companies to disclose the billions of dollars in payments that they make to governments around the world in exchange for the right to extract precious natural resources.

This year, NRGI and EITI Philippines (PH-EITI) partnered to develop contracts.ph-eiti.org, a country site that uses the ResourceContracts.org platform for publishing contracts in an open data format. The collaboration was initiated in May, when PH-EITI participated in the Extractives Open Data Leaders program at the International Open Data Conference in Ottawa.

Improving the impact of Mongolia’s extractive projects is not just about better contracts and proposed legal reforms. It is also very much about effectively monitoring and enforcing existing obligations.

Daniel Kaufmann, president and CEO of NRGI, delivered a video keynote address at the Australian Public Sector Anti-Corruption Conference in Brisbane.

Today, Switzerland-based trading house Trafigura disclosed how much it paid to several governments in exchange for commodities in its first annual responsibility report. For decades, physical commodity traders have embraced secrecy as a basic part of their business model, even when dealing with public institutions. The disclosures by Trafigura represent a much-needed step away from this unfortunate tradition. There remains, however, ample room for improvement.

The Open Government Partnership, which launched in 2011, quickly morphed into a popular initiative. OGP membership has grown from just eight countries to 66 participating nations. Many governments and international organizations have given it direct support.

The oil, gas and mining sectors are critical for a majority of Open Government Partnership (OGP) countries. Yet, only about 10 percent of OGP commitments relate to natural resources...

"It is my great hope that we will reach a day when the Open Government Partnership will not be needed. I wish for that day to come soon. Not because I have given up on the power of our work as governments and civil society together. To the contrary. Because I believe that open government should become a matter of course – the everyday means of empowering people."

Indonesia's President recently outlined new economic policies which aim to produce greater certainty and efficiency in business through deregulation, de-bureaucratization, and improved law enforcement. His overall objective is to revive foreign investment in Indonesia in the context of global economic slowdown.

Switzerland, the world’s leading commodity trading hub, must pave the way for more transparency in natural resource payments. The Swiss government should alter its course and include commodity trading in a pending transparency law.

NRGI joined World Bank and IMF executives and others on stage in Lima, Peru, to discuss "Individual Integrity and Public Sector Governance" and took part in a slate of other activities at the annual meetings.

NRGI has made a submission to the US SEC in relation to the rulemaking for Section 1504 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

Citizens from resource-rich African countries are showing ever-greater interest in the management of extractive resources. Civil society members and journalists are demanding transparency and accountability.

This week, 29 participants from 13 countries — including Ghana, Chile, Uganda, Myanmar, Mongolia and Guinea — are taking part in our third annual Executive Course in Oil, Gas and Mining Governance in Oxford.

For Indonesia, lower commodity prices have had mixed results. Government revenues from oil, natural gas coal and other minerals have fallen, but lower prices have also helped the Southeast Asian net importer.

On Thursday, 3 September, NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann joined a plenary conversation on the role of anti-corruption and transparency in the fight against poverty.

Myanmar’s citizens have the potential to benefit from the country’s endowments of oil, gas, and gems, but governance of these industries has been historically problematic and so many actors are pushing for change. Last month, NRGI staff began working with EITI stakeholders in Myanmar on a new project that will use the Natural Resource Charter to help build consensus on priorities for extractive industries reform.

During a June parliamentary hearing, Tunisia’s minister of industry, energy and mines shared previously undisclosed details regarding Tunisia’s resource sectors. He provided production, foreign investment and revenues figures. He announced the imminent launch of an open data platform that would give citizens access to updated extractives industry intelligence...

A largely bureaucratic legislator outside ministry control take the reins. The Southeast Asian nation could also create a new, non-operating state-owned enterprise that would participate in projects and operate alongside Pertamina, the state oil company. Whatever path the country chooses, allocating policing responsibilities is essential.

In the past six months, 24 countries have released new Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative reports disclosing over $200 billion in payments from more than 2,000 companies. These are the first reports prepared under the broader EITI Standard that was introduced in 2013...

In this wide-ranging interview, NRGI President Daniel Kaufmann discusses the merger that formed the nonprofit, its broad goals and country specific examples of strong and weak governance.