Recent Articles

What are "shadow reports" and how are they used to help OGP in making governments "more open, accountable, and responsive to citizens"? Paul Maassen, OGP civil society coordinator, says they provide "an extra tool to push for real government commitment."

In line with U.S. and EU legislation, the EITI now requires companies to report payments on a project-by-project basis. It also encourages countries to disclose the identity of the real owners—“beneficial owners” – of the companies that have acquired rights to extract oil, gas and minerals.

In March, Ukrainian police found 42 kilograms of gold and $4.8 million in cash in the home of the country’s former minister of energy...

NRGI and the Oil for Development Program of the Norwegian Agency for Development Cooperation's program seeks to accelerate civil society effectiveness in promoting the better management of oil, minerals, and gas...

More than a hundred civil society actors from various countries gathered to talk about two hot topics in the Asia-Pacific region: extractive issues and the future of natural resource governance.

At a recent proposal-writing workshop organized by the Revenue Watch Institute – Natural Resource Charter in Erbil, Iraq, three participants thoughtfully answered a question: how is oil a tool for development?

RWI and the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies are offering a foundation course on natural resource governance to civil society and media from Iraq, Lebanon, Libya and Tunisia. The deadline for application is 7 May 2014 and...

In April the Revenue Watch Institute [now the Natural Resource Governance Institute] organized a three-day workshop with Khazar University, in Baku, where stakeholders gathered from Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Russia, Tajikistan and Ukraine to strengthen their networks and knowledge of extractive issues.

Last month, Ilya Ponomarev earned a place in history as the only one of 446 members of the Russian Duma to vote against making Crimea a part of Russia. But back in December, I had an interesting exchange with him during one of the sessions I was delivering at the Revenue Watch Institute’s Eurasia parliamentary workshop...

A few weeks ago colleagues from the Myanmar Coalition for Transparency and Accountability and I represented Myanmar at RWI-NRC’s three-day training workshop on subnational governance of the extractive sector, in Bogor, Indonesia...

Most southeast Asian countries operate relatively well developed extractive sectors. However, at the local level, significant knowledge asymmetries remain...

Since the massive Oyu Tolgoi gold and copper mine opened in the Gobi Desert in 2010, billions of Mongolian tugrugs have poured into the government’s coffers in Ulaanbaatar...

In mismanaged economies, the path to government accountability and sustainability begins with transparency—but there is often resistance along the way. After all, power is at stake...

Tullow, the Anglo-Irish oil company that works mostly in Africa, voluntarily disclosed detailed information about the $1.5 billion it paid to governments in 2012 and 2013. Appearing in its 2013 Annual Report, the data is broken down by payment type (taxes, royalties, etc.) for each of Tullow’s projects, located in 22 countries

The new tool will help governments, civil society actors, and private sector operators benefit from the new standard.

The Revenue Watch Institute (RWI) has partnered with the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies (LCPS) to lay the groundwork for a regional “knowledge hub” that will be based in Beirut. Serving stakeholders in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), the new hub will support civil society, media, parliamentary and government efforts to promote transparency and accountability in the governance of natural resources.

There are few countries where EITI is as well-known and discussed by stakeholders as in the Democratic Republic of Congo. A platform for discussions between government ministries, civil society, industry and parliament, many such actors also see it as a major opportunity for governance reform in the DRC’s mining and oil sectors.

The Natural Resource Governance Institute is rolling out this year’s training program for Ghanaian, Tanzanian, and Ugandan journalists interested in improving their knowledge of and skills in covering the extractive sectors...

An international conference for a critical evaluation of efforts to monitor resource governance in the region's oil, gas and mining industries in August 2014, in Yaoundé, will contribute to civil society organizations' (CSOs), journalists', and parliamentarians' efforts with respect to resource management at regional, national, and local levels.

Hon. Ilya Ponomarev sat down with Revenue Watch at the December 2013 regional parliamentary workshop on extractives in Istanbul to discuss his views on the state of transparency in Russia as well as international transparency initiatives.

Oil, gas and mineral revenues are incredibly important for the Eurasian region, where several resource-rich states depend heavily on extractive resources. With an average of 40 percent of government income coming from oil, gas and mining, it is important that citizens have a say in how these resources are spent.

Last week at a workshop in Burkina Faso’s capital, Ouagadougou, coalitions from five African countries presented the results of their efforts to combine legal analysis of contracts with detailed on-the-ground monitoring of implementation and interviews with key government, community and mining company officials.

Revenue Watch, the School of Public Policy at the Central European University, and the Natural Resource Charter are now accepting applications for 2014's advanced course, "Reversing the Resource Curse: Theory and Practice."