Recent Articles

In Nigeria, perhaps no institution is associated with corruption more than the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation. In a conversation at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, NRGI director of governance programs Alexandra Gillies and co-author Alex Sayne delved deep into their report on the labyrinthine opacity of the state-owned entity.

Poor governance and systemic corruption are prevalent in many resource-rich countries. Given their highly concentrated and highly profitable nature, the oil, gas and mining industries can generate the kind of political and private incentives that favor rent-seeking and institutional (or state) capture.

Nigeria's President recently announced that former ExxonMobil executive Emmanuel Ibe Kachikwu will head the national oil company, the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC). Eight top NNPC officials were sacked, and the head of crude oil marketing was “reassigned.” A list of fresh appointments soon followed.

Extractive industry governance and the role of state-owned enterprises across sub-Saharan Africa are squarely in the spotlight after three huge scandals.

Bad practices have kept the West African nation from operating competitively and transparently in oil and gas. Important regulatory agencies including the NNPC are considered weak and unaccountable. The newly elected government has some heavy lifting to do to enact real change.

Well-documented corruption scandals have cost Ugandans billions. Mining’s contribution to GDP dropped from 30 percent in the 1960s to less than 0.4 percent now. At an NRGI-SPP course, the Nigerian perspective on oversight responsibilities in natural resources and the importance of harmonizing the interests of the regional and federal governments was seen as key to reform.

The price of oil, the commodity that more than any other determines the fortunes of Nigeria, has fallen over 50 percent since June 2014. The country’s 37 billion barrels of oil reserves are now significantly less valuable than before...

The Nigerian government has released a PriceWaterhouseCoopers audit report about the financial flows between the national oil company and the country's treasury. The document joins a long list of reports that reach a common conclusion: the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation is broken, and requires urgent overhaul.

The win by opposition leader Muhammadu Buhari signals a major step forward for Nigerian democracy. It’s the first time a Nigerian opposition party has won since military rule ended in 1999, and the elections seem to have been relatively peaceful.

Oil is the lifeblood of modern economy. The discourse about how oil has made or marred the destinies of nations is intrinsically linked to its governance...

The challenges of governing Nigeria’s oil sector are many. Years of corruption and theft – and now plummeting oil prices - present a tough mix for an economy largely dependent on resource revenues.

A new assessment by the Nigeria EITI points to important reforms.

Switzerland-based commodity trading firms are behind a much larger proportion of African governments’ oil sales than previously thought, new research from the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI), the Berne Declaration and SWISSAID has shown.

Tonight, Revenue Watch heads to the movies for the New York premiere of the documentary Big Men. The film tells the story of the competing claims that followed Ghana’s discovery of oil, and in parallel presents Nigeria’s experience with oil as a cautionary tale.

Nigeria's latest oil scandal has erupted, and it's a big one. This week, an online media outlet leaked a letter from the country's central bank governor to the president accusing the national oil company of failing to transfer $50 billion in oil revenues to the treasury between January 2012 and July 2013.

Along with costs induced by violent conflicts in the Niger Delta, the phenomenon has cost Nigeria an estimated loss of $30 billion and poses one of the greatest challenges to contemporary Nigeria.

During a Ted Talk, the U2 frontman called out corruption as one of the primary forces hindering faster progress towards zero poverty.

A new documentary addresses the failings of fuel subsidy management in Nigeria.

Nigeria's proposed Petroleum Industry Bill, before parliament now, could actually make the country's oil industry worse.

The draft Petroleum Industry Bill currently before parliament is unlikely to significantly boost performance of the country’s troubled national oil company.

Crude oil sales make up 70 percent of the government’s annual revenue, so it's imperative for journalists to know how oil revenue is managed.

RWI's Dauda Garuba joined Al Jazeera to discuss whether Nigeria's government has effectively protected the environment against oil operations.

A recent report evalutates the performance, promise and limitations of the Nigerian EITI as an anti-corruption tool.

Nigeria's removal of longstanding fuel subsidies sparked the largest protest in Nigeria’s history and new debates over managing oil wealth.