Recent Articles

Earlier this year, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni signed the Public Finance Management Act 2015 into law and created one of the world's newest sovereign wealth funds. While the law provides a solid framework for effective governance, several key elements are missing—elements that would determine whether Uganda will truly benefit from its oil windfalls.

Parliamentarians have a crucial role to play in reviewing legislation on oil, gas and minerals, and in overseeing the government’s management of these extractive sectors. For instance, in Ghana members of parliament are actively overseeing the projections and allocations of oil revenues by scrutinizing compliance with the Petroleum Revenue Management Act...

This week, 29 participants from 13 countries — including Ghana, Chile, Uganda, Myanmar, Mongolia and Guinea — are taking part in our third annual Executive Course in Oil, Gas and Mining Governance in Oxford.

Lack of transparency about complex, often secretive structures. Clandestine, opaque relationships with government officials. These factors exacerbate the risks that beneficial owners of some extractive companies could easily engage in tax evasion, transfer pricing, trade mispricing, bribery, contract fraud and money laundering.

Less than five years after the surge of optimism that accompanied first oil, Ghana’s economic situation has rapidly worsened. Ghana is now often cited as a cautionary tale of how not to manage public finances.

Ghana’s petroleum industry has undergone massive changes in recent years. Discoveries of commercial quantities of oil in the Jubilee fields in 2007 have triggered significant growth in Ghana’s petroleum sector and brought hope that petroleum resources will yield meaningful benefits for Ghana’s people...

Managing public expectations is one of the toughest challenges that governments face now that commodity prices have dramatically declined. A gathering earlier this month in Tanzania brought together public officials from 15 emerging producers to discuss the implications of the price drop on their strategies.

NRGI is rolling out this year’s training program for African journalists interested in improving their knowledge of and skills in covering the extractive sectors of oil, gas and minerals.

Uganda's Ministry of Energy and Mineral Development (PEPD) recently extended the deadline for firms to submit bids in its first-ever round of licensing for six oil blocks in the Albertine Graben...

This week, NRGI is hosting extractives experts from six countries to at the International Open Data Conference (IODC) in Ottawa, Canada.

Well-documented corruption scandals have cost Ugandans billions. Mining’s contribution to GDP dropped from 30 percent in the 1960s to less than 0.4 percent now. At an NRGI-SPP course, the Nigerian perspective on oversight responsibilities in natural resources and the importance of harmonizing the interests of the regional and federal governments was seen as key to reform.

Across sub-Saharan Africa, civil society groups and journalists have been playing an increasingly important role in advocating for governance reform. Part of their aim is to increase the chances that their countries’ sub-soil wealth might be transformed into meaningful strides in development.

Tunisia has been celebrated by the international community as a beacon of hope and as fertile ground for transitional democracy in a region rocked by political conflict and unrest.

In the latter part of 2014 global oil prices fell at one of the most rapid paces in history. In Ghana this exposed a precarious fiscal situation that has undermined the high ambitions expressed by Ghanaians just a few years ago. Countries like Uganda and Tanzania that are currently shaping policies and laws to manage “resource curse” pressures can surely learn from Ghana’s troubling experience.

In December, the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI), in partnership with a team of trainers at the Yangon School of Journalism (YJS) launched the first dedicated, comprehensive course for journalists...

This recently posted video is from the 2014 high-level executive extractives course at Oxford University’s Blavatnik School of Government.

Students from the Madeleine Albright Institute of Global Affairs at Wellesley College recently asked NRGI governance policy analyst Marie Lintzer some fundamental and important questions about the governance of the extractive sector. We share the informative Q&A here on NRGI’s blog.

Increasing the transparency in the extractive industries has been a battle that has been fought over the last decade. The Publish What You Pay coalition launched in 2002, and the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) was created a year later. The result? Public awareness of the size and potential of revenues from oil, gas and mining grew, and a movement towards open data in the sector has gathered steam.

Falling oil prices have had dramatic effects on the solvency of highly oil-dependent countries, particularly those that have not saved much of their windfall receipts in boom years. In November, Ghana’s finance ministry presented its 2015 Budget Statement and Economic Policy to parliament...

Ghana’s Minister of Finance has tabled before the country’s parliament the government’s 2015 budget and economic policy statement. The budget statement includes economic forecasts, estimated revenues and proposed resource allocation for the upcoming financial year, as well as projections for 2015 petroleum receipts.

Ghana’s oil production is in full swing, and measures must be put in place at every stage of the process to maximize the benefits. Can new digital technologies play a role?

For more than a century, mining has played a prominent role in Ghana’s economy. Despite recent mine closures spurred by falling gold prices, the sector has averaged $2 billion per year for more than five years, accounted for 6 percent of GDP, and contributed 18 percent of total corporate tax earnings and 27 percent of total government revenues...

On July 16, 2014, the Tax Appeal Tribunal of Uganda ruled in favor of the Uganda Revenue Authority (URA) in its suit against Tullow Oil...