Recent Articles

Crystol Energy founder Dr. Carole Nakhle discusses the changing contractual and fiscal environment for producer countries – particularly in the MENA region – amid a lengthy oil slump.

In 2014 NRGI’s MENA Regional Knowledge Hub (a partnership with the Lebanese Center for Policy Studies [LCPS]) offered its first foundation course on natural resource governance to civil society actors and members of the media from Iraq, Lebanon, Libya and Tunisia. In this course, participants strengthen their understanding of the oil and gas sectors and develop skills to engage in effective policy advocacy or reporting.

NRGI is rolling out this year’s training program for African journalists interested in improving their knowledge of and skills in covering the extractive sectors of oil, gas and minerals.

Minerals account for almost half of Mongolia’s gross domestic product, making extractive sector oversight an important function of the country’s government. In recent years, NRGI has worked with Mongolia’s leaders to improve transparency and better harness national revenues...

Well-documented corruption scandals have cost Ugandans billions. Mining’s contribution to GDP dropped from 30 percent in the 1960s to less than 0.4 percent now. At an NRGI-SPP course, the Nigerian perspective on oversight responsibilities in natural resources and the importance of harmonizing the interests of the regional and federal governments was seen as key to reform.

Across sub-Saharan Africa, civil society groups and journalists have been playing an increasingly important role in advocating for governance reform. Part of their aim is to increase the chances that their countries’ sub-soil wealth might be transformed into meaningful strides in development.

Tunisia has been celebrated by the international community as a beacon of hope and as fertile ground for transitional democracy in a region rocked by political conflict and unrest.

In 2013, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) adopted a new standard that would, among other things, help civil society organizations communicate and collaborate with government on extractive sector issues, especially in regions with weak dialogue among stakeholders. One of those regions is Eurasia, which has a number of EITI implementing countries.

At a recent Istanbul workshop on extractive sector transparency in Eurasia, Rysbek Toktogul—tax and financial compliance manager at Kyrgyzstan’s largest mining project—stood out as the only private sector executive in the room.

The dramatic fall in the value of oil and other commodities over the past six months has impacted both governments and communities in resource-rich countries, and has sent many searching for lessons learned during previous periods of price crashes.

On March 30, Asiia Sasykbaeva, deputy speaker of parliament in Kyrgyzstan, met with Galib Efendiev, Eurasia director for the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI), to exchange views on the country’s mining sector development and legal framework.

In partnership with Fundacion Foro Nacional Por Colombia, the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI) organized a resource revenue management workshop for trainers in Bogota, from 16 to 20 March....

As part of our programming, NRGI has developed five briefings offering an overview of the current situation in Myanmar's extractive sector on the following topics: EITI, contract disclosure, revenue management, state-owned enterprises and fiscal regimes.

The 2011 Tunisian uprising brought about unprecedented levels of freedom for civil society groups suddenly no longer hindered by regime co-optation or repression...

NRGI and Petrad are pleased to announce that we are accepting applications for the 2015 NRGI-Petrad Petroleum Governance Fellowship. The program seeks to increase civil society leaders’ effectiveness in promoting the better management of petroleum for the public good. In 2015 the fellowship will be open to civil society leaders from the following countries: Ghana, Iraq, Myanmar, Tanzania and Uganda.

In December, the Natural Resource Governance Institute (NRGI), in partnership with a team of trainers at the Yangon School of Journalism (YJS) launched the first dedicated, comprehensive course for journalists...

This recently posted video is from the 2014 high-level executive extractives course at Oxford University’s Blavatnik School of Government.

Falling oil prices have had dramatic effects on the solvency of highly oil-dependent countries, particularly those that have not saved much of their windfall receipts in boom years. In November, Ghana’s finance ministry presented its 2015 Budget Statement and Economic Policy to parliament...

Ghana’s Minister of Finance has tabled before the country’s parliament the government’s 2015 budget and economic policy statement. The budget statement includes economic forecasts, estimated revenues and proposed resource allocation for the upcoming financial year, as well as projections for 2015 petroleum receipts.

Since 2008, NRGI has partnered with academic institutions around the world to provide regionally relevant analysis and training to oversight actors, and to reduce capacity asymmetries between governments and extractive industry players.

For more than a century, mining has played a prominent role in Ghana’s economy. Despite recent mine closures spurred by falling gold prices, the sector has averaged $2 billion per year for more than five years, accounted for 6 percent of GDP, and contributed 18 percent of total corporate tax earnings and 27 percent of total government revenues...

A study tour in September brought six Mongolian MPs and three parliamentary staff members to western Canada, where they met with tax and public finance officials from British Columbia and Alberta, provincial and federal legislators, leaders of Canada’s First Nations (indigenous communities), and representatives from industry who work with mining-affected communities.

Four years ago, Mongolia’s vast mineral wealth prompted some to call it the “Saudi Arabia of Central Asia”. Today, the country is struggling with declining mineral revenues and inflation.

In resource-rich countries around the world, senior-level policymakers face difficult extractive sector decisions—from how to attract investors and manage revenues to how to engage citizens and protect the environment.