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Recently CSOs from eight Eurasian countries gathered in Istanbul for a regional meeting of extractive sector governance stakeholders, preceded by a two-day training organized by the NRGI and the Publish What You Pay secretariat...

The road from Myitkyina to Hpakant is one of the worst I have ever traveled. After nine hours on this bumpy mountain path dotted with military checkpoints, I enter the heart of Myanmar’s jade country...

The Canadian federal government has tabled a new law that would require oil, gas and mining companies to publicly disclose payments they make to governments around the world.

NRGI and the School of Public Policy at the Central European University are now accepting applications for the 2015 edition of their advanced extractives course. A limited number of scholarships are available on a competitive basis to qualified applicants from Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ghana, Guinea, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Mexico, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nigeria, and Tanzania.

A study tour in September brought six Mongolian MPs and three parliamentary staff members to western Canada, where they met with tax and public finance officials from British Columbia and Alberta, provincial and federal legislators, leaders of Canada’s First Nations (indigenous communities), and representatives from industry who work with mining-affected communities.

Four years ago, Mongolia’s vast mineral wealth prompted some to call it the “Saudi Arabia of Central Asia”. Today, the country is struggling with declining mineral revenues and inflation.