News

The Nigerian government has released a PriceWaterhouseCoopers audit report about the financial flows between the national oil company and the country's treasury. The document joins a long list of reports that reach a common conclusion: the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation is broken, and requires urgent overhaul.

Tunisia has been celebrated by the international community as a beacon of hope and as fertile ground for transitional democracy in a region rocked by political conflict and unrest.

In the latter part of 2014 global oil prices fell at one of the most rapid paces in history. In Ghana this exposed a precarious fiscal situation that has undermined the high ambitions expressed by Ghanaians just a few years ago. Countries like Uganda and Tanzania that are currently shaping policies and laws to manage “resource curse” pressures can surely learn from Ghana’s troubling experience.

In 2013, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI) adopted a new standard that would, among other things, help civil society organizations communicate and collaborate with government on extractive sector issues, especially in regions with weak dialogue among stakeholders. One of those regions is Eurasia, which has a number of EITI implementing countries.

At a recent Istanbul workshop on extractive sector transparency in Eurasia, Rysbek Toktogul—tax and financial compliance manager at Kyrgyzstan’s largest mining project—stood out as the only private sector executive in the room.

NRGI president Daniel Kaufmann recently visited Indonesia, where he met with editors from Tempo magazine. What follows is a reproduction of the resulting news story, “Good Governance Means the Rule of Law, Not the Rule of Man Prevails,” posted here with Tempo’s permission.